The American Association of University Women of Laguna Beach

(AAUW-LB), a 501(c)4 organization founded in 1967, is a dynamic growing organization with many exciting programs, interest groups and opportunities to get involved in the community. Our diverse membership includes residents of Laguna Beach and surrounding communities, spanning a wide range of ages and professions.

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) empowers women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. Our nonpartisan, nonprofit organization has more than 170,000 members and supporters across the United States, as well as 1,000 local branches and more than 800 college and university members. Since AAUW’s founding in 1881, our members have examined and taken positions on the fundamental issues of the day — educational, social, economic, and political. AAUW’s fellowships and grants have helped scholars and activists overcome barriers to education and advancement for nearly 130 years. Learn more and join us at www.aauw.org.

 

 

AAUW Wine Tasting Event raising funds for Scholarships

Stephanie, Jeannie & Johanna learn how to make wreaths.

Stephens, a wine consultant/buyer for Hi Times, led the wine tasting fundraiser for scholarships.

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TITLE IX NEEDS YOUR HELP IMMEDIATELY!

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October Event

 

 On October 28, members and prospective members met at the lovely home of Deana Pink to socialize and learn about our AAUW-LB service projects and interest groups. 

Click here to see a few more photos.

 

 

The Pay Gap

Did you know that 57 percent of men try to negotiate their salary, but only 7 percent of women do?

Women still only make 80 cents on the dollar. But you and AAUW can narrow that gap.

AAUW introduces Work Smart Online — a free salary negotiation course to help women earn the pay they deserve!

This easy, engaging e-tool will teach you to:

  • Learn the market value of your skills and experience
  • Determine an equitable “target salary” based on your experience and skills 
  • Ask for — and get — the pay you deserve

Here’s the best part: The program works! In surveys with our participants, nearly all reported having more confidence and better negotiating skills after taking the class.

TAKE WORK SMART ONLINE TODAY AND IMPROVE YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE!

Training 10 million women in salary negotiation is central to AAUW’s goal of closing the gender pay gap by 2030.  By changing laws, improving employer practices, and empowering women to negotiate their own futures — through AAUW Work Smart Online and efforts — we can make it happen.

We’re building a movement, and we need your help to spread the word.

Please urge your family, friends and followers to take AAUW Work Smart Online course and, if they like it (we know they will!), to share it with their networks as well.

Share Work Smart Online on social media!

 

Thanks for being a part of AAUW’s efforts to make sure that all women get paid what they deserve — and to help close the gender pay gap once and for all!

Nonprofit Awards $3.9 Million

to 250 Women and Projects

WASHINGTON —The American Association of University Women (AAUW) announced awards of $3.9 million to its 2018–19 class of fellows and grantees. These 250 recipients represent diverse backgrounds, locations, and areas of study but have one thing in common: They all aim to promote equity for women and girls.
“AAUW fellows and grantees have contributed to — and will continue to impact — so much of the world at large,” said Kim Churches, the chief executive officer of AAUW. “These trailblazers are breaking the mold in nontraditional fields and redefining what leadership and expertise look like. AAUW is proud to provide the critical resources necessary to help them excel in their chosen fields.”

AAUW is one of the world’s oldest leading supporters of graduate women’s education, having awarded more than $115 million in fellowships, grants, and awards to 13,000 women and projects from more than 145 countries since 1888. Candidates are evaluated on the basis of scholarly excellence, quality and originality of project design, and active commitment to helping women and girls through service in their communities, professions, or fields of research.

AAUW fellowship funding helps women manage the growing burden of student debt, an issue that disproportionately affects women. Unique to AAUW’s program, funding may also be used to pay for expenses outside of those traditionally associated with academic study, including child care and transportation — necessities that can help recipients’ continue, return to, and successfully completegraduate programs. AAUW prides itself on providing fellowships and grants for women returning to either extend or complete their academic goals.

“We are proud to have these awardees join and add to the over 130-year legacy of our notable alumnae,” added Churches. “Recipients now join the ranks of past awardees including journalist Melissa Harris-Perry, Ph.D., and astronaut Judith Resnik, Ph.D., to name a few. These awards change lives and these scholars, they change the world.”

Applications open August 1 each year. Deadlines vary by program. To find out more about this year’s exceptional class of awardees, visit AAUW’s online directory.

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) empowers women and girls through research, education, and advocacy. Our nonpartisan, nonprofit organization has more than 170,000 members and supporters across the United States, as well as 1,000 local branches and more than 800 college and university members. Since AAUW’s founding in 1881, our members have examined and taken positions on the fundamental issues of the day — educational, social, economic, and political. AAUW’s fellowships and grants have helped scholars and activists overcome barriers to education and advancement for 130 years. Learn more and join us at www.aauw.org.

 

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In Azar v. Garza (formerly Garza v. Hargan), the issue before the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit is whether the government can set and enforce policies that veto an individual’s right to access abortion care; intimidate and coerce individuals who choose to end their pregnancies; and do so on the basis of the individual’s age and immigration status. 

AAUW signed onto an amicus brief asking the D.C. Circuit to affirm the class certification and preliminary injunction issued by the U. S. District Court for the District of Columbia, which would allow access to abortion without the interference of this government policy despite immigration status. The district court order defined the class as all pregnant, unaccompanied immigrant minors who are or will be in the legal custody of the federal government.   

This amicus brief was offered in support of Jane Doe, Jane Moe, Jane Poe, and Jane Roe (“the Janes”) and a class of unaccompanied immigrant minors in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), who are being denied access to abortion. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) represents the Janes and filed a preliminary injunction on their behalf, describing attempts by ORR Director Scott Lloyd to personally coerce young women to carry their pregnancies to term instead of having an abortion, and to personally force them to go to religiously-affiliated “crisis pregnancy centers.”

 

AAUW Laguna Beach Foundation

Awards $32,500 in Scholarships

 

The AAUW Laguna Beach Foundation, through community fundraising efforts, awarded $16,000 in scholarships to students from

  • Laguna Beach High School
  • Dana Hills High School (new this year)
  • Saddleback College (designated for Women Returning to College)
  • Orange Coast College (designated for Women Returning to College)
  • UCI (designated for Returning Women Students in a STEM program).  

    This year $4500 was granted to 3 students to attend the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders (NCCWSL). Two students were from Orange Coast College and one student was from Laguna College of Art + Design (LCAD).

    We awarded $9,000 to 10 middle school girls to attend the popular Tech Trek science-related summer camps located on the UCI and UCSD campuses.  Eight girls were from Thurston Middle School in Laguna Beach, and two new awards were for girls from Venado Middle School in Irvine, a Title 1 school. 

    The AAUW Laguna Beach Foundation also granted $1500 to the El Morro Tutoring program called The Learning Club (TLC).

    In addition to the scholarships listed above, the Foundation contributes $750 each to the Legal Advocacy Fund (LAF) and to AAUW Fellowships and Grants, one of the world’s largest sources of funding for graduate women. 

   The total amount for 2018 was $32,500.00, which included local and national funding.

   A special recognition goes to Susan Kent, AAUW-LBF treasurer.  She managed the Foundation’s distribution of local, state, and national donations of $32,500.00 for our current scholarship year.  She is an amazing and caring woman, who made sure all had a say in the decision making.

   Others on the Foundation Board who are responsible for oversight of funds are Deana Pink, Director, and Nancy Miller, Secretary.  Others, who worked on scholarships and grants and who were instrumental in the thoughtful and successful giving of funds were as follows:

  • Scholarship Coordinators:Miriam Kranser, Nancy Lawrence, Lesley Danziger,

   Sharon Donoff, Barbara Hamkalo

  • Tech Trek leader, Alice Apkarian, and her team
  • TLC Co-chairs: Peggie Thomas, Kathy Willman.

 

These dedicated women helped make a difference in the lives our awardees.  We appreciate and thank them all! 

 

Scholarship Committee Meeting

 

front row:  Deana Pink, Susan Kent, Sharon Donoff, Lesley Danziger

back row:  Karen Dennis, Miriam Kranser, Nancy Lawrence, Tracy Hartman, Jean Vivrette.  Not pictured, Barbara Hamkalo.

Who shoulders most of nation’s $1.4 trillion in student debt? Women

Women owe about $890 billion of the country’s $1.48 trillion student loan debt, nearly double the $490 billion owed by men, placing them at a financial disadvantage as they begin their careers, according to a recently released report from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).

The study, which analyzed data from the U.S. Department Education from the 2015-2016 school year, also found that women graduating with bachelor’s degree owe on average $2,700 more in student loans than men do. Women, who account for 56 percent of enrolled college students, are far more likely than men to graduate owing money — 71 percent for female grads vs. 66 percent for male grads, according to the AAUW.

Black women graduate with the most college debt, averaging about $30,400, topping the roughly $22,000 white women owe and the $19,500 white men owe. 

Read more…..